Archives for posts with tag: Joyce jones

Director Kaspar Collin’s excellent I Called Him Morgan film documents the interconnected life and downfall of the late, brilliant trumpeter Lee Morgan and his common law wife Helen Morgan and is getting an impressively wide release for a documentary film on a jazz musician. We published a lengthy review of the film, too.

One of the film’s standout features is the amount of interviews with musicians who knew and could give firsthand accounts on their remembrances of Lee and Helen. That drove Suga’ in My Bowl host Joyce Jones into the digital archives and she dug up excerpts from previous shows with trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, bassist Bob Cranshaw, and pianist Harold Mabern for snippets on Lee Morgan. Check them out below.

Advertisements

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.
 
We’re off this week, but if you missed last week’s show with drummer and percussionist Milford Graves, head on over to our audio archives and check it out. Meanwhile, the music rolls on as the fall begins to settle in.
 
Vision Fest promoters Arts for Art present a short series on Race and Resistance at El Taller Latinoamericano from October 10-12. Highlights include a talk on October 11th moderated by Suga in My Bowl host Joyce Jones and featuring poet Jesus Papoleto Melendez and dancer Patricia Nicholson Parker on the topic of Race and Resistance. Melendez also reads his poetry later that night. Bassist William Parker and drummer Hamid Drake appear in a trio on the 12th. See the full schedule and details at their website.
 
Saxophonist Marshall Allen makes a rare non-Arkestra appearance at The Stone on October 12 with the UB313 ensemble.
 
Pianist and keyboardist Marc Cary hosts the Harlem Sessions at Ginny’s Supper Club on October 13 and 27th.
 
Drummer and percussionist Bobby Sanabria leads Quarteto Ache at Clem’s Place in Newark NJ the 14th and is at the Brooklyn Heights Public Library for a free afternoon show with Gene Marlow’s Heritage Ensemble on the 15th.
 
Saxophonists Billy Harper and David Murray are at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Appel Room on October 14-15 with pianist Elio Villafranca’s “Letters to Mother Africa”.
 
Trombonist Craig Harris is at Harlem’s Rendall Memorial Presbyterian Church on October 14th and 21st.
 
Low brass specialist on tuba Joe Daley is at Terra Blues with Hazmat Modine on October 15th.
 
Saxophonist Oliver Lake is at Roulette in Brooklyn for the Passin’ Thru Festival on October 16-17. He leads a big band on the 16th and is joined by fellow TRIO3 collaborators bassist Reggie Workman and drummer Andrew Cyrille on the 17th.
 
BRIC Arts Media’s second annual Jazz Festival runs through October 15 at the BRIC Media House in downtown Brooklyn. There are free concerts on the 11-12 followed by three marathon nights of jazz from the 13-15 with saxophonist David Murray’s Infinity Quartet, saxophonist Lakecia Benjamin and the Soulsquad, guitarist Julian Lage’s trio, pianist and keyboardist Marc Cary, and guitarist Marc Ribot’s trio with bassist Henry Grimes among many other acts. The full schedule is up on the BRIC Arts media website and see our own preview for more details.
 
Pianist Vijay Iyer will be at the McCarter Theater in Princeton NJ on Oct. 21 and Columbia University’s Miller Theater on the 22nd.
 
Vocalist Catherine Russell is at the McCarter Theater on October 22nd.
 
Drummer and percussionist Will Calhoun is at Applehead Recording in Saugerties NY for a session with the Zig Zag Power Trio on the 22nd.
 
Drummer Roy Haynes is at The Blue Note on October 24-25.
 
Drummer and percussionist Will Calhoun’s gallery exhibit of his visual art collaboration Aza is on view at the Bronx Music Heritage Center through February 11. We reviewed the show earlier this year.
 
Finally, the Jazz Loft According to W Eugene Smith documentary film is running at the Metrograph Theater. See our review from a screening last year.
 
That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl is back on WBAI‘s airwaves on October 16. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.
 
—-
Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Suga in My Bowl radio presents a new weekly feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

Program note: Suga’ in My Bowl has changed to a biweekly schedule on WBAI Radio and now alternates Sunday nights with Sports Qualified at our usual 11 PM -1 AM time period. You’ll get the same great show; just every other week! So mark your calendars or just keep up with us via our Facebook page, the blog here, or our main website and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

Suga’ in My Bowl is off the air this week and will be pre-empted next week for the winter pledge drive. Join us on air on Sunday March 8th. To get your fix until then, check out our our audio archives. Meanwhile, let’s take a look at some upcoming gigs.

Who_Owns_draft_pic2

We start with our own event this week: On February 18th “Who Owns Music?” lands at Harlem’s Raw Space for an exciting discussion between bassist William Parker, writer/poet Quincy Troupe, WBGO Radio’s Sheila Anderson, Grammy nominated vocalist René Marie, Ahmed Abdullah, Music director of Sista’s Place and hosted by Suga’ in My Bowl’s Joyce Jones and Hank Williams. It’s a fundraiser for WBAI Radio. Admission is $15 at the door. More details at our site.

Carl Hancock Rux’s play “Stranger on Earth” based on writer James Baldwin’s words has shows at HarlemStage on the City College of New York’s campus on February 19-20.

Pianist Harold Mabern will be at Smoke for the New Drum Battle on February 20th-22nd.

Art Historian Kellie Jones will be at Columbia University’s Low Library in the morning of February 21st for a panel discussion on Romare Bearden’s “Odyssey”.

Pianist Marc Cary‘s residency at the Cell Theatre continues with late sets on February 21st.

Vocalist Catherine Russell is at Nico’s Kitchen and Bar in Newark NJ for a jazz brunch on the 22nd.

Bassist Alex Blake leads a Quartet at Zinc Bar on the 24th.

Bassist Reggie Workman and saxophonist Oliver Lake will be at the Village Vanguard on February 24th-28th as part of TRIO 3.

Blues vocalist Alexis P. Suter will be at The Turning Point in Piermont, NY on February 28th.

Harpist Brandee Younger will be at Minton’s in Harlem on March 1st.

That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl is back on WBAI‘s airwaves March 1. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Suga in My Bowl radio presents a new weekly feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

Program note: Suga’ in My Bowl has changed to a biweekly schedule on WBAI Radio and now alternates Sunday nights with Sports Qualified at our usual 11 PM -1 AM time period. You’ll get the same great show; just every other week! So mark your calendars or just keep up with us via our Facebook page, the blog here, or our main website and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

This week’s show features an interview with guitarist Marc Ribot. You can catch him at the Village Vanguard on February 11,13,15th. And we have the usual line-up of live music this week.

We start with our own event this week: On February 18th “Who Owns Music?” lands at Harlem’s Raw Space for an exciting discussion between bassist William Parker, writer/poet Quincy Troupe, WBGO Radio’s Sheila Anderson, Grammy nominated vocalist René Marie, Ahmed Abdullah, Music director of Sista’s Place and hosted by Suga’ in My Bowl’s Joyce Jones and Hank Williams. It’s a fundraiser for WBAI Radio. Admission is included with a $25 membership pledge to WBAI or $15 at the door. We’ll have more details up on the site soon.

Professor Michele Wallace will host a screening and discussion on the 100th anniversary of the Birth of a Nation film at NYU’s Gallatin School on February 9th.

Pianist Geri Allen will be at Columbia University’s Miller Theater on February 12th for a musical tribute to the visual artist Romare Bearden. She’ll also be part of a pre-concert discussion with Columbia University Professor Robert O’Meally.

Saxophonist Lakecia Benjamin leads her Soulsquad at Minton’s on February 12th.

Organist John Medeski is at the Village Vanguard on February 12th.

Vocalist Diane Schuur will be at Iridium on February 13th – 15th.

Vocalist Dianne Reeves will be at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater on February 13th and 14th.

Marc_Cary_Cell_Residency

Pianist Marc Cary‘s residency at the Cell Theatre continues with late sets on February 14th and 21st.

Harpist Brandee Younger is also at the Cell Theatre with a quartet for the late set on February 14th.

Poet Sonia Sanchez will be appearing at an event honoring Malcolm X at Harlem’s Shabazz Center (formerly the Audubon Ballroom) on February 14th.

BarnardBlues-460px

Professors Farah Jasmine Griffin and Robert O’Meally will be at Barnard College’s Diana Hall on February 14th for a discussion on Bessie Smith. It’s just one event in a larger symposium on the Blues at Barnard. Admission’s free, but reservations are recommended since space is filling up fast.

Vocalist Catherine Russell has two upcoming New Jersey shows. You can catch her at William Paterson University’s Shea Performing Arts Center in Wayne NJ on the 14th or Nico’s Kitchen and Bar in Newark NJ for a jazz brunch on the 22nd.

Trombonist Craig Harris presents “Brown Butterfly”, a Muhammad Ali tribute, at Harlem’s Mt. Morris Ascension Presbyterian Church at 3 PM on February 15th.

Looking ahead, Carl Hancock Rux’s play “Stranger on Earth” based on writer James Baldwin’s words has shows at HarlemStage on the City College of New York’s campus on February 19-20.

Art Historian Kellie Jones will be at Columbia University’s Low Library in the morning of February 21st for a panel discussion on Romare Bearden’s “Odyssey”.

Lastly, pianist Harold Mabern will be at Smoke for the New Drum Battle on February 20th-22nd.

That’s all for now. With our biweekly schedule, Suga’ in My Bowl is back on WBAI airwaves February 22nd. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

bandstand_picSuga in My Bowl radio presents a new feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

The October 13th show was en encore presentation of our guide to the musical history of Brazil, “The Brazilian Journey“, hosted by Dr. Judith King-Calnek, and produced and engineered by Suga’ in My Bowl host Joyce Jones. It’s a 3 CD set on offer for a pledge to WBAI Radio during their fall fund drive. And while I’m at it, I’ll point you to the earlier interview we did with Dr. King-Calnek.

And there’s music for you to catch this week.

The musical Lady Day continues its run at the Little Schubert Theater at 422 W. 42nd St starring vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater as Billie Holiday.




You have 3 chances to see Bobby Sanabria, who hosted our Journey special. He’ll be at the Americas Society at 980 Park Avenue with his Multiverse Big Band for the Music of the Americas concert on October 15th. On the 19th, he’ll appear with the Eugene Marlow Heritage Ensemble for the free “We’ve Got Rhythms Concert” at 2:00 p.m. at the Brooklyn Public Library’s Brooklyn Heights Branch at 280 Cadman Plaza West in Downtown Brooklyn. Finally, on the 24th, he’ll appear with the Eugene Marlow Heritage Ensemble at the historic Nuyorican Poets Café.

Bassist Christian McBride will be at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Dizzy’s Club with a big band and a trio from October 21st to the 27th.

Drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts leads a quartet at Harlem’s Ginny’s Supper Club on October 26th.

Saxophonist Gary Bartz will be leading a Quintet at Smoke on November 1st and 2nd.

Vocalist Carol Maillard will be at the at the Tarrytown Music Hall on November 8th as part of the legendary Sweet Honey in the Rock.

Looking ahead, several Suga’ guests will be at Cape May, NJ Exit Zero Jazz Festival. Vocalist Dianne Reeves appears on November 8th. Last month’s guest saxophonist Kenny Garrett and pianist Marc Cary’s Focus Trio take the stage on November 9th.

Dianne Reeves will also be at the Moody Jazz Festival in Newark on November 9th.

That’s all for now. Remember to tune in to the next Suga’ in My Bowl on Sunday, November 3rd on WBAI, where we’ll have another edition of “On the Bandstand”.

A reminder that WBAI radio is still in serious financial trouble. Help keep Suga’ (and all your other favorite shows) on the air by pledging whatever you can. Consider becoming a “WBAI Buddy” with a monthly pledge.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

Dr. Judith King-Calnek

Dr. Judith King-Calnek

Suga’ in My Bowl is offering “The Brazilian Journey” as a premium in the February pledge drive at WBAI Radio. Suga’ host and executive producer Joyce Jones reached out to Dr. Judith King-Calnek to tap her enormous wealth of knowledge and lead our listeners through a fascinating tutorial of the Brazilian musical tradition, as we’ve done previously with “The Journey” and “The Blues Journey“, charting Afro-Latin and the Blues, respectively. We thought it would be interesting to extend “The Brazilian Journey” with a short “behind the scenes” chat for the blog and Dr. King-Calnek graciously agreed. Questions by Suga’ assistant producer Hank Williams.

When did you first become interested in Brazilian music?

I’ve always been interested in music and am not sure when I actually distinguished between musical genres. I remember loving songs like “Summer Samba” (by Marcos Valle & his brother) and Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66, and other things that entered into the rotations of American radio stations during the Bossa Nova invasion, but I didn’t think of them as or know them to be Brazilian. I think in the late ’60s and early ’70s even the popular radio stations were much more open to a wider array of sounds, from Brazil, Africa (hits from Hugh Masakela, Miriam Makeba and Manu Dibango), which opened up a lot of musical space for anyone who was musically curious.

I think in the late ’60s and early ’70s even the popular radio stations were much more open to a wider array of sounds, from Brazil, Africa […] which opened up a lot of musical space for anyone who was musically curious.

What was the first album that really stood out to you and what was special about it?

There were two albums: first was Flora Purim’s “Open Your Eyes You Can Fly”, which completely blew my mind. The other was Gilberto Gil’s “Nightengale”, which really excited me. Later I would come to realize that Gil’s “Nightengale” was an Americanized version of his Brazilian release “Refavela”, which I prefer. Both Flora’s and Gil’s music felt liberating. The rhythms were infectious and the melodies dared to go where other music didn’t go.

With so much music to choose from, how did you decide on which recordings to highlight in “The Brazilian Journey”?

I tried to think of music that exemplifies different historical, geographical, and musical phases in Brazil. It’s really hard because there’s SO much great music that inevitably something will be left out.

Is there anything you wish you’d covered, but couldn’t fit?

I woke up the other night, at about 2 in the morning and said, “Oh no! I didn’t talk about the Quilombo dos Palmares! or the Tailor’s Revolt (Revolta dos Alfaiates)! I didn’t talk about the Samba Schools Portela and Mangueira! I didn’t talk about this year’s carnival themes. Did I mention that Paulo Moura was not only a great saxophonist, but clarinetist as well? I should’ve ended with Trio da Paz and other great Brazilian musicians here in New York…” and on and on. In short, there is a LOT that I didn’t include. I’m sorry. I hope my musician friends and lovers of the music will forgive me.

What are a few key points you’d like listeners to take away from TBJ?

Brazil is a huge country — larger than the continental United States. It has an incredibly rich history, a dynamic present and a very promising future. I’m just offering a very small taste, the tip of the iceberg, if you will, to whet your appetite for the delicious world of Things Brazil.

How was the experience doing a radio documentary like this?

I LOVED working with Joyce Jones! It felt like spending time with two friends: great Brazilian music and Joyce. I am hopelessly in love with Brazil, its music and culture, and it brings me immense pleasure to share that passion with other folks. Also, I love doing radio and have missed it sorely since I’ve been off the air, so this was a great experience for me. Thank you very much for inviting me. Muito obrigada!

What do you think radio’s importance is in a world of video on demand and seemingly unlimited streaming audio options?

I’m an old time radiohead, so my view is a biased one. I like the organic relationship that radio has with a live audience. There is something very rich about local radio. But I do have to say that I love the fact that I can stream stations and listen even if I’m out of the area.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Just that I’ve really enjoyed this experience and thanks again for inviting me. It’s helped me fight away the winter blahs.

Excerpts from “The Brazilian Journey” will air on WBAI Radio, 99.5 FM in the NYC area and streaming online at wbai.org from 11 PM – 1 AM Eastern Standard Time on February 16, 2013. You can make a pledge for the entire set on CDs at WBAI’s donation site.

Judith King-Calnek teaches anthropology, theory of knowledge and history at the United Nations International School, where she is the Head of the Humanities Department. She has taught anthropology at Manhattanville College in Purchase, NY. Her publications have focused on education and citizenship in various contexts (international schools, Brazil and the United States). Her most recent publications on free people of color in 19th Century Virginia reflect her continued interest in the intersection of race/color and citizenship in socially stratified societies. King-Calnek holds a Ph.D. in comparative education and anthropology from Teachers College Columbia University as well as two master’s degrees (curriculum and teaching and anthropology and education) from the same institution, and a BA from Pomona College. In addition to her teaching and researching, Judith King-Calnek pursues her long time love of Brazilian music and jazz as a radio programmer and producer in the New York area, for which she has received numerous awards. She is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish.

Hank Williams is a assistant producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

%d bloggers like this: