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bandstand_picSuga in My Bowl radio presents a new feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

BluesPeople_Image_smallWe start this week’s listings with tonight’s guest, Dr. Farah Jasmine Griffin who appears as part of a reflection on the 50th anniversary of Amiri Baraka’s Blues People book in a free event at the Newark Museum. Writer Amiri Baraka and professors Guthrie Ramsey and Robert G. O’Meally are also on the panel.

The musical Lady Day continues its run at the Little Schubert Theater at 422 W. 42nd St starring vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater as Billie Holiday.




Pianist Marc Cary and his Focus Trio have one night at the Jazz Standard on Wednesday December 4th.

Akiko_headshot-199x300Organist Akiko Tsuruga has 3 shows this week. On December 4th she’ll be at An Beal Bocht Café on West 238th St in the Bronx (which is a short walk from the #1 train line) with her octet. On Friday the 6th, she’ll be at the Honeycomb Playhouse Speakeasy at 735A St. Nicholas Ave (at 147th St.), and you can catch her Saturday night at Showman’s on West 125th St.


Drummer and bandleader Bobby Sanabria has a free show at Brooklyn Academy of Music’s BAM Café on the 6th.

Kenny Garrett Will be at the Iridium from December 6th to the 8th.

Looking further ahead, pianist Harold Mabern appears at the Jazz Standard as part of saxophonist George Coleman’s New Octet from December 11th-15th.

Drummer Will Calhoun plays a free show at the BAM Café on December 13th.

Drummer Michael Carvin will be at the Kitano Jazz Club on December 13th and 14th.

That’s all for now. Thanks to our new, expanded schedule, we now appear weekly except for the last Sunday of the month. Tune in to the next Suga’ in My Bowl on Sunday, December 8th on WBAI, where we’ll have another edition of “On the Bandstand”.

A reminder that WBAI radio is still in serious financial trouble. Help keep Suga’ (and all your other favorite shows) on the air by pledging whatever you can. Consider becoming a “WBAI Buddy” with a monthly pledge.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

bandstand_picSuga in My Bowl radio presents a new feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

Rene_Marie_EvilWe start with the subject of tonight’s show, Vocalist Rene Marie, who will be doing songs from her Eartha Kitt tribute I Wanna Be Evil, at the Jazz Standard from November 21st to 24th.

Drummer and bandleader Bobby Sanabria Bobby Sanabria and his Multiverse Big Band are at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Dizzy’s Club from November 21st to 24th.

The musical Lady Day continues its run at the Little Schubert Theater at 422 W. 42nd St starring vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater as Billie Holiday.




On the 22nd, pianist Michele Rosewoman and her “New Yor-Uba” small ensemble will be at the Clemente Soto Velez Center on the Lower East Side as part of Arts for Art’s Latin Free Jazz mini-festival.

Harpist Brandee Younger will be at the PAC House Theater4 in New Rochelle, NY on November 23rd.

Finally, organist John Medeski will be at Le Poisson Rouge on November 24th as part of a 78th birthday celebration for Roswell Rudd.

Weston_HarperThe Randy Weston and Billy Harper duo will be at the Iridium on November 26-27th, doing songs from their new The Roots of the Blues release.

Looking much further ahead, Kenny Garrett Will be at the Iridium from December 6th to the 8th.

That’s all for now. Thanks to our new, expanded schedule, we now appear weekly except for the last Sunday of the month, which means that we’re off next week. Tune in to the next Suga’ in My Bowl on Sunday, December 1st on WBAI, where we’ll have another edition of “On the Bandstand”.

A reminder that WBAI radio is still in serious financial trouble. Help keep Suga’ (and all your other favorite shows) on the air by pledging whatever you can. Consider becoming a “WBAI Buddy” with a monthly pledge.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

bandstand_picSuga in My Bowl radio presents a new feature, On The Bandstand where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests.

There are no immediate area shows for tonight’s guest, saxophonist Rene McLean, but watch this space for when he’ll be around next. Fortunately, there’s other music for you to catch this week.

The musical Lady Day continues its run at the Little Schubert Theater at 422 W. 42nd St starring vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater as Billie Holiday.




Drummer Jeff “Tain” Watts plays with Niels Lan Doky at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Dizzy’s Club on November 13th and leads a quartet at Brooklyn’s Shapeshifter Lab on the 15th.

Harpist Brandee Younger appears with a quartet for free on November 14th, 7 PM, at the main branch of the Brooklyn Public Library in their Dweck Center.

Drummer and bandleader Bobby Sanabria appears on November 16th with the Eugene Marlow Heritage Ensemble at the Congregation Adas Emuno in Leonia, NJ.

Craig_HarrisTrombonist and multi-instrumentalist Craig Harris appears on November 17th 3 PM at the Mount Morris Association Presbyterian Church. That’s at 122nd and Mount Morris Park West in Manhattan and admission is less than the price of a movie. Details are on Craig’s website.

Looking ahead to next week, on the 22nd, pianist Michele Rosewoman and her “New Yor-Uba” small ensemble will be at the Clemente Soto Velez Center on the Lower East Side as part of Arts for Art’s Latin Free Jazz mini-festival.

Finally, organist John Medeski will be at Le Poisson Rouge on November 24th as part of a 78th birthday celebration for Roswell Rudd.

That’s all for now. Thanks to our new, expanded schedule, we now appear weekly except for the last Sunday of the month. Tune in to the next Suga’ in My Bowl on Sunday, November 17th on WBAI, where we’ll have another edition of “On the Bandstand”.

A reminder that WBAI radio is still in serious financial trouble. Help keep Suga’ (and all your other favorite shows) on the air by pledging whatever you can. Consider becoming a “WBAI Buddy” with a monthly pledge.

Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

Suga' in My Bowl

The next show will air on Sunday March 24, 2013 from 11 PM to 1 AM Eastern Standard Time on WBAI Radio, 99.5 FM in the NYC metro area or streaming online at wbai.org. This installment of the program will feature vocalist and pianist Diane Schuur. Listen to a short preview below:

481165_10151495232041170_424525180_nBorn in Tacoma, Washington, in December 1953, Schuur was blind from birth. She grew up in nearby Auburn, Washington, where her father was a police captain. Nicknamed Deedles at a young age, Schuur discovered the world of jazz via her father, a piano player, and her mother, who kept a formidable collection of Duke Ellington and Dinah Washington records in the house.

She was still a toddler when she learned to sing the Dinah Washington signature song, “What a Difference a Day Makes.” Armed with the rare gift of perfect pitch, Schuur taught herself piano…

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Don’t miss our next show on WBAI Radio!

Suga' in My Bowl

Note: Suga’ in My Bowl’s new Behind the Mic blog is now up and running. We’ll use it to expand on some of the shows, artists, and ideas you’ve heard on the show and post related content, new release info, and provide a space for discussion. We’re still tweaking it, but invite you to head over and check it out.

Our home station WBAI is in a serious crisis due to back back rent owed on their transmitter at NYC’s Empire State Building. They’ve struggled in the past, but this time the situation is serious. Details are on the Pacifica Radio Network home page. You can also donate directly to the transmitter fund.

The next show will air on Sunday March 10, 2013 from 11 PM to 1 AM Eastern Standard Time on WBAI Radio, 99.5 FM in the NYC metro area or streaming online at wbai.org

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Dr. Judith King-Calnek

Dr. Judith King-Calnek

Suga’ in My Bowl is offering “The Brazilian Journey” as a premium in the February pledge drive at WBAI Radio. Suga’ host and executive producer Joyce Jones reached out to Dr. Judith King-Calnek to tap her enormous wealth of knowledge and lead our listeners through a fascinating tutorial of the Brazilian musical tradition, as we’ve done previously with “The Journey” and “The Blues Journey“, charting Afro-Latin and the Blues, respectively. We thought it would be interesting to extend “The Brazilian Journey” with a short “behind the scenes” chat for the blog and Dr. King-Calnek graciously agreed. Questions by Suga’ assistant producer Hank Williams.

When did you first become interested in Brazilian music?

I’ve always been interested in music and am not sure when I actually distinguished between musical genres. I remember loving songs like “Summer Samba” (by Marcos Valle & his brother) and Sergio Mendes and Brasil 66, and other things that entered into the rotations of American radio stations during the Bossa Nova invasion, but I didn’t think of them as or know them to be Brazilian. I think in the late ’60s and early ’70s even the popular radio stations were much more open to a wider array of sounds, from Brazil, Africa (hits from Hugh Masakela, Miriam Makeba and Manu Dibango), which opened up a lot of musical space for anyone who was musically curious.

I think in the late ’60s and early ’70s even the popular radio stations were much more open to a wider array of sounds, from Brazil, Africa […] which opened up a lot of musical space for anyone who was musically curious.

What was the first album that really stood out to you and what was special about it?

There were two albums: first was Flora Purim’s “Open Your Eyes You Can Fly”, which completely blew my mind. The other was Gilberto Gil’s “Nightengale”, which really excited me. Later I would come to realize that Gil’s “Nightengale” was an Americanized version of his Brazilian release “Refavela”, which I prefer. Both Flora’s and Gil’s music felt liberating. The rhythms were infectious and the melodies dared to go where other music didn’t go.

With so much music to choose from, how did you decide on which recordings to highlight in “The Brazilian Journey”?

I tried to think of music that exemplifies different historical, geographical, and musical phases in Brazil. It’s really hard because there’s SO much great music that inevitably something will be left out.

Is there anything you wish you’d covered, but couldn’t fit?

I woke up the other night, at about 2 in the morning and said, “Oh no! I didn’t talk about the Quilombo dos Palmares! or the Tailor’s Revolt (Revolta dos Alfaiates)! I didn’t talk about the Samba Schools Portela and Mangueira! I didn’t talk about this year’s carnival themes. Did I mention that Paulo Moura was not only a great saxophonist, but clarinetist as well? I should’ve ended with Trio da Paz and other great Brazilian musicians here in New York…” and on and on. In short, there is a LOT that I didn’t include. I’m sorry. I hope my musician friends and lovers of the music will forgive me.

What are a few key points you’d like listeners to take away from TBJ?

Brazil is a huge country — larger than the continental United States. It has an incredibly rich history, a dynamic present and a very promising future. I’m just offering a very small taste, the tip of the iceberg, if you will, to whet your appetite for the delicious world of Things Brazil.

How was the experience doing a radio documentary like this?

I LOVED working with Joyce Jones! It felt like spending time with two friends: great Brazilian music and Joyce. I am hopelessly in love with Brazil, its music and culture, and it brings me immense pleasure to share that passion with other folks. Also, I love doing radio and have missed it sorely since I’ve been off the air, so this was a great experience for me. Thank you very much for inviting me. Muito obrigada!

What do you think radio’s importance is in a world of video on demand and seemingly unlimited streaming audio options?

I’m an old time radiohead, so my view is a biased one. I like the organic relationship that radio has with a live audience. There is something very rich about local radio. But I do have to say that I love the fact that I can stream stations and listen even if I’m out of the area.

Is there anything else you’d like to add?

Just that I’ve really enjoyed this experience and thanks again for inviting me. It’s helped me fight away the winter blahs.

Excerpts from “The Brazilian Journey” will air on WBAI Radio, 99.5 FM in the NYC area and streaming online at wbai.org from 11 PM – 1 AM Eastern Standard Time on February 16, 2013. You can make a pledge for the entire set on CDs at WBAI’s donation site.

Judith King-Calnek teaches anthropology, theory of knowledge and history at the United Nations International School, where she is the Head of the Humanities Department. She has taught anthropology at Manhattanville College in Purchase, NY. Her publications have focused on education and citizenship in various contexts (international schools, Brazil and the United States). Her most recent publications on free people of color in 19th Century Virginia reflect her continued interest in the intersection of race/color and citizenship in socially stratified societies. King-Calnek holds a Ph.D. in comparative education and anthropology from Teachers College Columbia University as well as two master’s degrees (curriculum and teaching and anthropology and education) from the same institution, and a BA from Pomona College. In addition to her teaching and researching, Judith King-Calnek pursues her long time love of Brazilian music and jazz as a radio programmer and producer in the New York area, for which she has received numerous awards. She is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish.

Hank Williams is a assistant producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

Former Suga’ in My Bowl guests Pat Metheny and Wayne Shorter both have new CDs out!

OrchProjCoverSmallRecent Grammy winner Metheny’s is a 2-CD set featuring more music from his Orchestrion Project (and is called just that), which features Metheny leading a band of contraptions that accompany him playing and (in a sense) improvise on their instruments. As a tour, Orchestrion filled an entire stage with its good-sounding (if somewhat Rube Goldberg-ish) robotic bandmembers and the new release features music recorded on the tour. In his 2011 live duo gigs at NYC’s Blue Note with bassist and longtime collaborator Larry Grenadier, a more modest version of the Orchestrion joined the two, with Metheny’s roadie theatrically pulling a cover off of the instrument mid-show.

“The word ‘jazz’ to me only means ‘I dare you.’” — Wayne Shorter

WIthout_a_net_coverMeanwhile, Wayne Shorter’s making the rounds with his new release, titled Without a Net. Long-time collaborators Danilo Perez, John Pattitucci, and Brian Blade join Shorter on piano, bass, and drums respectively. Shorter stopped by National Public Radio’s Saturday All things Considered show to talk about his latest CD and delved into his expansive vision of what jazz means, his time with Miles Davis, Buddhism, and quite a bit more. The interview’s worth checking out and we liked what we heard from the CD, which is out now.

Nate Chinen also has a write-up in the New York Times, which repeats Shorter’s view on the slippery definition of jazz: “The word ‘jazz’ to me only means ‘I dare you.’”

Did any of you catch Shorter’s recent NYC performance at Carnegie Hall? Do you have or are you planning to pick up the Shorter or Metheny releases? Let us know in the comments!

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