Archives for posts with tag: Archie Shepp

The annual Vision Fest returns his year for its 23rd edition and as usual provides a week full of avant garde jazz, dance, poetry, and visual art all under the same roof and available for the same admission fee. Single day passes are available and it’s probably a good idea to grab them in advance since the Wednesday night opening is already sold out.

The 2018 event is much earlier than usual: running from May 23-29, wrapping up on Memorial Day. It also features a return to Roulette in downtown Brooklyn after 3 years at Judson Memorial Church in Greenwich Village. Roulette’s extremely easy to access, though: it’s one long block from the Atlantic Avenue subways and LIRR station.

The festival officially started on Monday May 21 with films at Anthology Film Archives in Manhattan.

As is Vision’s tradition, the opening night on Wednesday May 23 is centered around an artist that Vision bestows with a lifetime achievement award. This year’s honoree is pianist Dave Burrell. As is Vision’s tradition, Burrell will perform in multiple ensembles during the course of the evening.

Burrell’s Harlem Renaissance suite featuring drummer Andrew Cyrille should be worth a look, and emanates from the intersection of his family’s history with the era.

Next up is what promises to be a historic reunion of former bandmates when Burrell joins legendary saxophonist Archie Shepp along with drummer Hamid Drake and bassist William Parker; the latter two are both familiar names to the Vision crowd. Burrell appears on several of Shepp’s classic early 1970s albums, including Live at the Pan African Festival, Blasé, Kwanza, and Attica Blues. Additionally, he’s been a more recent collaborator with Drake and Parker. The set promises to be a memorable one, as Shepp doesn’t gig too often in the US now.

Wednesday night’s closing set promises to be an exceptionally exhilarating ride, with Burrell leading a quintet with dual tenor saxophonists in Kidd Jordan and James Brandon Lewis, bassist William Parker, and drummer Hamid Drake. Jordan and Lewis are at opposite ends of the age spectrum, but both have a free-flowing wide open playing style and with Jordan drawing from the deep wells of the southern Blues for much of his inspiration, the pairing with the rising star Lewis should be special for all involved.

Thursday night kicks off with a panel discussion on the topic of “Creating Safe(r) Spaces in the Performing Arts,” featuring members of the We Have a Voice Collective, who released an open letter on sexism in Jazz.

Electric guitarist Mary Halvorson’s Code Girl ensemble starts Thursday night, followed by Vision veteran Whit Dickey’s trio. The Women With an Axe to Grind ensemble is something not to be overlooked, though. Bassist Jöelle Léandre will be making a rare US appearance and is joined by flutist Nicole Mitchell and violist Melanie Dyer.

Friday night brings pianist Matthew Shipp in different ensembles. Shipp teams up with Daniel Carter on saxophone/trumpet/flute and ever-present bassist William Parker for “Seraphic Light” early in the evening and leads the “Acoustic Ensemble” for the closing set. In between that, drummer Nasheet Waits’s “Equality” ensemble has a set that will be worth catching.

On Saturday, vocalist Fay Victor’s “Mutations for Justice” hits early in the evening. Victor’s freeform vocals are nearly otherworldly at times, creating a sonic palette for improvisations reminiscent of reed instruments. Slightly later, trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire joins pianist Kris Davis and drummer/percussionist Tyshawn Sorey for another highly anticipated experimental set. Drummer/percussionist Francisco Mora Catlett draws Saturday night’s cleanup slot with a variation of his long-running Afro-Horn ensemble with trumpeter Ahmed Abdullah as a special guest.

Sunday starts with an afternoon panel discussion moderated by writer Scott Currie, this time for part one on the topic of “The Ongoing Struggle for Cultural Equality in NYC Music Communities” with poet Steve Cannon, pianist Dave Burrell, bassist William Parker, trombonist Craig Harris, Bernadette Speach, and Adam Shatz. Later on, Harris closes out the evening with his “Brown Butterfly” suite.

Memorial Day Monday brings another afternoon panel discussion and continues Sunday’s theme. Mike Heller moderates a panel of bassist Reggie Workman, trumpeter Ahmed Abdullah, saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc, bassist Luke Stewart, drummer Warren Smith, and dancer Patricia Nicholson Parker.

Fly or Die, Trumpeter Jamie Branch’s first release as a leader, gained favorable reviews last year. You get a chance to see her ensemble live in the evening’s first set of music. Slightly later Cooper-Moore gets a solo piano set followed by saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc’s “New World Pygmies.”

Finally, saxophonist Oliver Lake’s big band closes out the entire festival on Monday night. The final festival set is traditionally a large affair and this year should be no different, especially for someone with the compositional skills of Lake. People unfamiliar with Vision might have different ideas of what a big band sounds like, but Lake’s effort here is likely to be one that swings hard while creating multiple spaces for free improvisation and pushes the boundaries.

One unique attribute of Vision is the atmosphere it intentionally creates be breaking down boundaries between audience and musicians and even musicians themselves: it’s not uncommon to see musicians attend on different days simply to watch the other sets as audience members. There’s also a vending area open every night that provides the opportunity to take home some of the music one hears and possibly even get it autographed on the spot.

Vision’s one of the most highly anticipated festivals on our calendar every year at Suga’ in My Bowl radio, and for good reason. It’s a festival of Jazz that intentionally brings one back to the roots of what the music should be about: improvisation, community, and creativity.

For a deeper dive into this year’s honoree Dave Burrell, check out our show that aired on May 13 on WBAI. Our May 27 show will focus on trumpeter Freddie Hendrix, who’ll be part of Oliver Lake’s big band on the same night. It will air on WBAI (and stream online) from 11 PM-1 AM on the 27th and be archived on our site afterwards.

We’ll also check back in with a review and photos after Vision wraps up.

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Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York. Find him on Twitter @streetgriot

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bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

We’re off this week, but if you missed last week’s show of 2018 Winter Jazz Fest preview coverage with vocalist Fay Victor, head over to our archives to hear it. Be sure to tune in next week, when vocalist Jazzmeia Horn’s our guest! Keep an eye out for our review this week.

Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington and pianist Vijay Iyer are at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium for a discussion on sexism in jazz on January 15 as part of the Winter Jazz Fest. Admission is free with RSVP.

Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington, pianist Vijay Iyer, bassist Linda May Han Oh, vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater, Professor Farah Jasmine Griffin, drummer Jeff Tain Watts, saxophonist Tia Fuller and many more will be at the the New School’s Tishman Auditorium for a tribute to pianist Geri Allen on January 16 as part of the Winter Jazz Fest. Event proceeds go Geri Allen’s estate.

Saxophonist Archie Shepp and Flutist Nicole Mitchell are at Le Poisson Rouge for a discussion on jazz and protest moderated by saxophonist Ras Moshe on January 16 as part of the Winter Jazz Fest. It precedes a concert by Mitchell.

Flutist Nicole Mitchell has two shows this week at Le Poisson Rouge to wrap up the Winter Jazz Fest, where she’s this year’s artist in residence. On January 16, she presents the Afrofuturist Mandorla Awakening II: Emerging Worlds.  On January 17, Maroon Cloud with vocalist Fay Victor ends the festival.

Vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater is at the HarlemStage Gatehouse on January 16 for an Ella Fitzgerald celebration.

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble is at the Blue Note from January 19-21.

Bassist Linda May Han Oh is at the Jazz Gallery with Jonathan Blake’s trio from January 21-22.

Drummer Terri Lyne Carrington is at The Stone’s Lower East Side location on January 28.

That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl will be back on WBAI‘s airwaves on Sunday January 21. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

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Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York. Find him on Twitter @streetgriot

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

This week’s show wraps up our 2018 Winter Jazz Fest preview coverage with vocalist Fay Victor! You have three opportunities to hear her at the Winter Jazz Fest. She’ll be leading SoundNoiseFUNK on January 12 . She’ll be with Darius Jones’s LawNOrder on January 13 at Midnight. And she’ll be with Nicole Mitchell’s Maroon Cloud on January 17 at Le Poisson Rouge. Keep an eye out for our annual Cheat Sheet in-depth preview and a post-event report.

 

 

Pianist Vijay Iyer leads a sextet at Birdland from January 9-13.

Percussionist Steve Kroon leads a sextet at Smoke on January 10.

Hammond B3 Organ master Dr. Lonnie Smith leads a trio at the Jazz Standard from January 11-14.

Pianist Vijay Iyer leads a sextet at Birdland from January 9-13.

Saxophonist Billy Harper leads a quintet at Smoke from January 12-14.

Vocalist Kurt Elling is at Birdland for an early set on January 14.

The Hypnotic Brass Ensemble is at the Blue Note from January 19-21.

 

Vision Fest promoters Arts for Art’s monthlong Justice is Compassion festival of avant garde jazz, dance, and visual art is going on right now and continues at the Lower East Side’s Clemente Soto Velez Center through January 12 with different sets almost nightly and there’s a lot going on this week.

Bassist William Parker plays on January 8 with JP Carletti’s trio.

Saxophonist James Brandon Lewis has a duo with pianist Aruan Ortiz on January 9.

William Parker’s brilliant, swirling, Songs for a Free World composition with vocalist Fay Victor is on January 10.

Pianist David Virelles performs on January 11.

All sets are at Clemente Soto Velez. There’s a preview further down and you can see the the full schedule here.

 

Also on the horizon is the annual Winter Jazz Fest which returns from January 10-14. This year’s artists in residence is flutist Nicole Mitchell, who’ll have several sets at the festival. Other highlights include talks on sexism in jazz and jazz protest with saxophonist Archie Shepp. There’s a tribute to Alice Coltrane by saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and the usual marathon nights of music on January 12-13. We’ll have more details in the next show and publish our annual cheat sheet and review online. Stay tuned for all of that.

That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl will be back on WBAI‘s airwaves on Sunday January 21. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

—-
Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York. Find him on Twitter @streetgriot

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

We’re off the air this week, but if you missed last week’s show with our tribute to the late pianist Geri Allen and preview of the 2018 Winter Jazz Fest, head on over to our archives to listen to that and many others. You can catch him in January at the Winter Jazz Fest.Keep an eye out for our annual Cheat Sheet in-depth preview and a post-event report.

Pianist Harold Mabern leads various ensembles at Smoke through January 7.

Drummer and percussionist Bobby Sanabria is the headliner at the Bronx Music Heritage Center’s New Year’s eve event on December 31.

Bassist William Parker teams up with drummer William Hooker for a duo set at the Clemente Soto Velez Center on the Lower East Side on January 3 as part of an Amiri Baraka tribute at Arts for Art’s ongoing Justice is Compassion festival. He also has a set on January 8 with drummer JP Carletti and on the 10th with his expansive “Songs for a Free World” composition.

Saxophonist James Brandon Lewis leads Heroes are Gang Leaders at the Clemente Soto Velez Center on the Lower East Side on January 3 as part of an Amiri Baraka tribute at Arts for Art’s ongoing Justice is Compassion festival. He’s also there for a duo set with pianist Aruan Ortiz on the 9th.

Saxophonist T.K. Blue has a free lunchtime concert on January 3 at the Gateway 2 center in downtown Newark NJ.

Looking further ahead, Bassist/vocalist Richard Bona leads a group at Club Bonafide on January 5.

Pianist Vijay Iyer leads a sextet at Birdland from January 9-13.

Percussionist Steve Kroon leads a sextet at Smoke on January 10.

Hammond B3 Organ master Dr. Lonnie Smith leads a trio at the Jazz Standard from January 11-14.

Pianist Vijay Iyer leads a sextet at Birdland from January 9-13.

Saxophonist Billy Harper leads a quintet at Smoke from January 12-14.

Vocalist Kurt Elling is at Birdland for an early set on January 14.

Vision Fest promoters Arts for Art’s monthlong Justice is Compassion festival of avant garde jazz, dance, and visual art is going on right now and continues at the Lower East Side’s Clemente Soto Velez Center through January 12 with different sets almost nightly. Bassist William Parker, pianist David Virelles, saxophonist James Brandon Lewis, dancer Patricia Nicholson Parker, vocalist Fay Victor, and poet Amina Baraka are all on the list of events, which includes a tribute to the late poet and jazz journalist Amiri Baraka on January 2-3. There’s a preview further down and you can see the the full schedule here.

Also on the horizon is the annual Winter Jazz Fest which returns from January 10-14. This year’s artists in residence is flutist Nicole Mitchell, who’ll have several sets at the festival. Other highlights include talks on sexism in jazz and jazz protest with saxophonist Archie Shepp. There’s a tribute to Alice Coltrane by saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and the usual marathon nights of music on January 12-13. We’ll have more details in the next show and publish our annual cheat sheet and review online. Stay tuned for all of that.

That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl will be back on WBAI‘s airwaves on Sunday January 7. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

—-
Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York. Find him on Twitter @streetgriot

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.

This week’s show focuses on the late pianist Geri Allen with reflections from several people in the jazz world who knew her well. You can see and hear all of them and many more at the tribute concert on January 15 at the New School’s Tishman Auditorium as part of the Winter Jazz Fest. We’ll have more Winter Jazz details at the bottom of the segment, but first the rest of this week’s listings.

Pianist Harold Mabern leads various ensembles at Smoke until January 7.

Vibraphonist Roy Ayers is at Iridium on December 26-27.

Vocalist René Marie is at the Jazz Standard from December 28-31.

Drummer and percussionist Bobby Sanabria is the headliner at the Bronx Music Heritage Center’s New Year’s eve event on December 31.

Saxophonist T.K. Blue has a free lunchtime concert on January 3 at the Gateway 2 center in downtown Newark NJ.

Looking further ahead, Bassist/vocalist Richard Bona leads a group at Club Bonafide on January 5.

Pianist Vijay Iyer leads a sextet at Birdland from January 9-13.

Percussionist Steve Kroon leads a sextet at Smoke on January 10.

Vision Fest promoters Arts for Art’s monthlong Justice is Compassion festival of avant garde jazz, dance, and visual art is going on right now and continues at the Lower East Side’s Clemente Soto Velez Center through January 12 with different sets almost nightly. Bassist William Parker, pianist David Virelles, saxophonist James Brandon Lewis, dancer Patricia Nicholson Parker, vocalist Fay Victor, and poet Amina Baraka are all on the list of events, which includes a tribute to the late poet and jazz journalist Amiri Baraka on January 2-3. There’s a preview further down and you can see the the full schedule here.

Also on the horizon is the annual Winter Jazz Fest which returns from January 10-14. This year’s artists in residence is flutist Nicole Mitchell, who’ll have several sets at the festival. Other highlights include talks on sexism in jazz and jazz protest with saxophonist Archie Shepp. There’s a tribute to Alice Coltrane by saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and the usual marathon nights of music on January 12-13. We’ll have more details in the next show and publish our annual cheat sheet and review online. Stay tuned for all of that.

That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl will be back on WBAI‘s airwaves on Sunday January 7. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.

—-
Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York. Find him on Twitter @streetgriot

Left-Right: Gary Burton, Wendy Oxenhorn, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, Linda Oh, Catherine Russell, Jimmy Heath, Karriem Riggins

Left-Right: Gary Burton, Wendy Oxenhorn, Pharoah Sanders, Archie Shepp, Linda Oh, Catherine Russell, Jimmy Heath, Karriem Riggins


Words by Hank Williams | Photos by Joyce Jones. Creative Commons CC-NC-BY-ND.
 
2016 marks the 50th year of the National Education Association’s annual Jazz Master Fellowship Awards, and the traditional tribute concert, held on April 4 this year at Washington DC’s Kennedy Center, paid homage to the new honorees in style as they joined a select group of figures from the illustrious history of the music.
 
The awards grew out of NEA’s support for jazz, which started in 1969 with a grant to George Russell and the realization that despite its central cultural role in the US, jazz as a form had fallen on hard times in the 1960s with diminished audiences and little support. The Jazz Master Awards themselves began in 1982 to formally honor musicians who have achieved a particularly high level of achievement. Nominations can actually be made by anyone, though the awardees are selected by a panel of jazz experts.
 
This year, saxophonists Archie Shepp and Pharaoh Sanders, vibraphonist Gary Burton, and Jazz Foundation of America executive director Wendy Oxenhorn were awarded Jazz Master Awards.
 
It was special for us at Suga’ in My Bowl because of the amount of former guests on our radio show represented at the ceremony. We interviewed Archie Shepp this month and Pharoah Sanders, Gary Burton, David Murray, Randy Weston, Billy Harper, Lakecia Benjamin, and Catherine Russell are all former guests.
 
The concert which is streamed live over the Internet (and will be archived online soon) featured arrangements of signature compositions by the honored musicians played by ensembles made of former jazz masters and younger musicians. The format highlights the continuity of the music and also provides the opportunity for interesting combinations that might not otherwise happen.
 
Shepp was the first of the new awardees profiled and the ensemble played a medley of his pieces ending with “Blues for Brother George Jackson” from the Attica Blues album. Shepp’s funky, soulful tribute to the Black Panther Party member killed by California prison officials.
 
Pianist Jason Moran (also the event’s host), trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, bassist Linda Oh, drummer Karriem Riggins, conguero Pedrito Martinez, trombonist Roswell Rudd, and saxophonists Rudresh Mahanthappa and David Murray interpreted Shepp’s work for a big band, which Shepp himself revisited with new ensembles years later.
 
David Murray played Shepp’s part, while the robust rhythm section handled the strong backbeat the piece is known for. Although piano wasn’t part of the original, Moran’s part added welcome texture to the piece.
 

Archie Shepp: What is the relevance of jazz music if it reaches no further than middle class homes that can afford musical instruments and music instruction?

Shepp’s brief acceptance speech mirrored the politically engaged themes of the chosen song and much of his work, calling for the need to reach out to poor communities and engage them with the music:
 
“Finally we might ask ourselves what is the meaning of the arts and humanities if they are only available to a class of people. What is the relevance of jazz music if it reaches no further than middle class homes that can afford musical instruments and music instruction? It is essential that our schools universities and institutions reach out to the ghettoes the wretched communities which frequently languish outside their doors. They must create hope where there is despair, lest this world become what you see a virtual reality show.”
 
Shepp’s comments clearly reverberated among the performers and audience, with several others on stage acknowledging or echoing his points. He also had kind words for Pharoah Sanders. “We go back a long way”, said Shepp, “and he’s really like a brother to me”.
 

2016 NEA Jazz Masters Pharoah Sanders and Archie Shepp

2016 NEA Jazz Masters Pharoah Sanders and Archie Shepp


 
Vibraphonist Gary Burton was the next recipient introduced. Pianist (and Jazz Master) Chick Corea and vibraphonist Stefon Harrris were tapped to recreate Burton’s “Crystal Silence”, which he and Corea recorded together.
 

Gary Burton: “This generation that Chick and I were part of was around when the pioneers [of jazz] were still around. I feel that we’re in a unique position to carry on and pass on what we’ve learned”.

The meaning wasn’t lost on Burton, who joked that it was strange to actually hear his own work being played. “I’ve been playing that song with Chick for over 40 years”, he recalled.
 
Burton also reinforced the idea of social responsibility in his remarks. “This generation that Chick and I were part of was around when the pioneers [of jazz] were still around. I feel that we’re in a unique position to carry on and pass on what we’ve learned”.
 
Pharoah Sanders was introduced next. Jason Moran handled the introduction, pointing to the innovative work that came from Sanders’s collaboration with John Coltrane, especially on the latter’s groundbreaking Ascension album.
 
Pianist Randy Weston and saxophonist Billy Harper rekindled their collaboration for their Roots of the Blues project to honor Sanders. While most of the musical selections interpreted songs composed by the recipients, Weston instead selected something from his own catalog with “The Healers”. It was an appropriate choice, given Sanders’s heavy focus on spirituality in his work.
 
After Weston introduced the melody, he was joined by Harper and the duo went through the introspective piece that was a reminder that although Sanders is remembered for his fiery compositions of epic length and virtuosity, there’s a contemplative side to him as well.
 
Sanders, generally a humble man of few words, appeared overjoyed at the honor. “All I can say is the creator has a master plan”, he quipped, referencing one of this classic songs. “I just want to say thank you with a lot of peace and life to all of you — and to my family”. With that, he looked at Harper and Weston, who he suggested were his musical family.
 
Wendy Oxenhorn was the last recipient introduced and received the NEA’s A.B. Spellman Award for jazz advocacy. Several video tributes stressed the important role the Jazz Foundation of America has played in supporting musicians who cannot work or need financial help.
 
The program ended with Billy Taylor’s “I Wish I Knew How it Would Feel To Be Free” performed by saxophonists Jimmy Heath and Lakecia Benjamin, pianist Justin Coughlin, bassist Linda Oh, drummer Kareem Woods, and Catherine Russell’s vocals. The interplay between Heath and Benjamin highlighted the intergenerational nature of the event with the elder sax master generously encouraging Benjamin to take solos, seemingly pleased with her playing.
 
The event also kicks off the Smithsonian Museum’s annual Jazz Appreciation Month, meant to teach, highlight, and create excitement around the music. Lots of resources and educational material is available at the Smithsonian’s jazz website.
 
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Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.
 
Joyce Jones is the executive producer and host of Suga’ in My Bowl. She is a graphic designer and her photos have been published in Black Renaissance Noir.

bandstand_picPhoto Credit: Hank Williams

Welcome to Suga in My Bowl radio‘s weekly feature, On The Bandstand, where we collect upcoming NYC area shows from current and past Suga’ guests. We’re online weekly and on the air on NYC’s WBAI-FM radio alternate Sunday nights from 11 PM -1 AM. Keep up with us via Facebook, the blog here, or our main website, or Twitter and we’ll keep track of the schedule for you.
 
This week’s guest is saxophonist and NEA Jazz Master Archie Shepp! He has no immediate area shows, but you can catch the NEA’s tribute concert streamed live on Monday April 4 starting at 8 PM EST on the NEA website or on National Public Radio’s site. And we have lots more music for you this week.
 
The live stream of the NEA Jazz Masters tribute concert features performances by former Suga’ guests Randy Weston, Lakecia Benjamin, Billy Harper, David Murray, Catherine Russell and many more performers. Saxophonists Archie Shepp and Pharaoh Sanders are being honored. You can catch the stream right here:
 

 
Drummer and percussionist Bobby Sanabria takes part in a celebration of the music of the Dominican Republic at Manhattan School of Music’s Borden Auditorium on April 4th.
 
Arts for Art’s Justice is Compassion series runs through April 10th at Clemente Soto Velez Center with performances by bassist William Parker and dancer Patricia Nicholson Parker.
 
Saxophonist Pharaoh Sanders is at Birdland from April 5-9th.
 
Pianist Harold Mabern leads a trio at Village Vanguard from April 5-10th.
 
Organist John Medeski is at The Blue Note from April 5-10th with John Scofield.
 
Organist Dr. Lonnie Smith leads his Evolution ensemble at in a CD release party at Brooklyn Bowl on April 6th.
 
Film director Carol Bash is at Rutgers University Newark’s Institute for Jazz Studies for a talk and screening of her Mary Lou Williams documentary film The Lady Who Swings the Band on April 6th.
 
Drummer Michael Carvin leads a trio in a free lunchtime concert at Newark’s Gateway Center at 12 noon on April 7th.
 
Pianist Randy Weston celebrates his 90th birthday at Brooklyn’s Jazz 966 on April 8th.
 
Bassist Bob Cranshaw is at Smoke with George Coleman’s Quartet from April 8-10th.
 
Saxophonist Oliver Lake is at the Montclair NJ Public Library on April 9th.
 
Blues vocalist Alexis P. Suter is at The Turning Point in Piermont NY on April 9 and The Record Collector in Bordentown NJ on the 16th.
 
Bassist Christian McBride leads a trio at The Ridgefield Playhouse in CT on April 10.
 
Looking further ahead, Pianist Marc Cary and poet/vocalist Latasha Nevada Diggs are at Lincoln Center’s Atrium for a tribute to the late poet Jayne Cortez on the 14th. She also hosts tributes at Poets’ House on the 16th and Highline Ballroom on the 23rd: all of which are free!
 
Vocalist Catherine Russell is at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Appel Room on April 15-16.
 
Saxophonist Oliver Lake and trombonist Craig Harris will be at Aljira Contemporary Arts Center in Newark NJ on April 16th.
 
Low brass specialist on tuba Joe Daley is at Terra Blues with Hazmat Modine on the 16th.
 
Finally, Guitarist Pat Metheny returns to the area for a series of shows with bassist Ron Carter. The duo are at Norwalk CT’s Infinity Hall on April 20-21, Cape May NJ’s Exit Zero Jazz Fest on the 23rd, and Newton NJ’s Newton Theater on the 24th.
 
Also at Exit Zero is vocalist René Marie, who takes the stage on the 23rd.
 
That’s all for now. Suga’ in My Bowl is back on WBAI‘s airwaves on April 17th. We’ll also have another edition of “On the Bandstand” online next Sunday with a fresh set of listings.
 
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Hank Williams is an associate producer for Suga’ in My Bowl on WBAI Radio and webmaster for the Suga’ and Behind the Mic sites. He is also a PhD candidate in English and Africana Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center and teaches at Hunter and Lehman Colleges and The City College of New York.

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